The 43rd Annual Meeting of the Molecular Biology Society of Japan

Workshops

Workshops will be held as Zoom webinars. In addition to the live webcast, on-demand viewing will be also available for participants for approximately one week once it is ready.

Session Numbers: Date + AM/PM (A/P) + Workshop (W) + - (hyphen) + Channel
(ex.) 1AW-01: Day 1, AM, Channel 1

*Session time: (AM)9:00-11:30 /(PM)15:30-18:00
The total time for the presentations and discussions is 135 minutes as scheduled. However, additional 15 minutes have been allotted to allow more time for the change of speakers.
*Language: English only

"Meet the speakers" talk room will be available for both symposia and workshops after the session. Please use this room to talk with the speakers individually or to discuss among the speakers.

1AW-01 December 2 (Wed) AM
From transcriptional profiling to structure, dynamics, regulation, space, and disease -Innovative progress of single cell research-
Organizer
NOMURA, Seitaro (The University of Tokyo), ABURATANI, Hiroyuki (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Single-cell transcriptional profiling has now become a standard research procedure. Next we have to develop an innovative method to answer the question how the transcriptional products are generated and how these function in complex biological phenomena. In this workshop, we connect nucleosome structure and dynamics, phase separation and molecular interaction, epigenomic transcriptional regulation, transcriptional dynamics and phenotypic conversion, spatially-regulated cell-cell communication, disease initiation and progression, to draw future perspectives for next-generation single-cell research.

1AW-02 December 2 (Wed) AM
Functional non-coding RNAs in nuclear and chromosome dynamics
Organizer
SAITOH, Noriko (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research), IWASAKI, Yuka W. (Keio University)
Detail

Essential roles of functional non-coding RNAs in nuclear organization and gene expression have been revealed recently. In this workshop, we focus on functional RNAs that are involved in chromosome dynamics, epigenetic regulation, 3D genome architecture, and genome editing. Latest studies about formation and regulation of chromosome and chromatin dynamics uncovered by cutting-edge technologies will be shared, and we will discuss the significance hidden in non-coding regions of the genome.

1AW-03 December 2 (Wed) AM
Molecular mechanisms of translational control as key determinants of physiological homeostasis
Organizer
YANAGIYA, Akiko (Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University), JARAMILLO, Maritza (National Institute of Scientific Research (INRS))
Detail

Translational control (i.e. regulation of mRNA translation efficiency) plays pivotal roles in a variety of physiological processes and thereby enables cells to rapidly respond to extracellular changes such as infections and nutrient availability as it does not require de novo RNA synthesis. Notably, translation is a key player in gene expression in post-meiotic germ cells and early embryos, in which transcription is suppressed. Dysregulation of mRNA translation causes severe diseases such as cancer and diabetes. Moreover, a wide variety of intracellular pathogens alter host mRNA translation to promote infection. Therefore, a better understanding of translational control will contribute to developing novel therapeutic strategies. In this workshop, we will address the molecular mechanisms of translational control that are critical to maintaining physiological homeostasis in immune responses, metabolism and neural functions.

1AW-05 December 2 (Wed) AM
Methylation biology
Understanding the New Biological Phenomenon by Non-genomic Methylation
Organizer
KONNO, Masamitsu (Osaka University), HITACHI, Keisuke (Fujita Health University)
Detail

Although understanding of the biological phenomenon by methylation has been achieved on the genome so far, recent studies indicate the importance of non-genomic methylation for RNAs and proteins. In this workshop, we will introduce the latest findings of non-genomic methylation by young researchers to further understand the new roles of non-genomic methylation. We hope this workshop provides opportunities for other researchers to participate in this field.

1AW-06 December 2 (Wed) AM
Molecular interactions in parasitic and symbiotic complexes
Organizer
AOKI, Koh (Osaka Prefecture University), SATO, Masa H. (Kyoto Prefectural University)
Detail

In parasitic and symbiotic biological complexes, organisms interact with each other using various modes of information exchange. Recent progress in the functional genomics of non-model organisms have shed new light on the roles of bidirectional molecular transfer that mediate biological information. In this workshop, we focus on recent advances in elucidating molecular transfer and their roles in the regulation of parasitic and symbiotic complexes.

1AW-07 December 2 (Wed) AM
Spatiotemporal diversity in inflammatory cells in biology and pathobiology
Organizer
MANABE, Ichiro (Chiba University), OIKE, Yuichi (Kumamoto University)
Detail

While inflammation is essentially protective, its dysregulation leads to various non-communicable diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Inflammatory processes are the complex cellular interplays that are spatiotemporally diverse and dynamic. Recent advances in single cell and visualization technologies have begun to shed new light on those processes. In this workshop, we will discuss the diversity in cells and their interactions in the initiation, progression, resolution of inflammation as well as the recovery and maintenance of tissue homeostasis.

1AW-08 December 2 (Wed) AM
Forefront of molecular biology and life-aging-disease-death unraveling from "nucleus and mitochondrial synergy"
Organizer
TANAKA, Tomoaki (Chiba University), MINAMINO , Tohru (Juntendo University)
Detail

Development of molecular biology accurately capturing nuclear events such as epigenome abnormalities and genomic instability, would be the key to reveal the mystery of life, namely "life-aging-disease-death". On the other hand, from the viewpoint of life span, various biological models including budding yeast, C. elegans, and drosophila have been actively analyzed, and aging signals such as telomere, DNA damage, oxidative stress, sirtuin, nutrition, metabolism, are commonly concentrated in the crosstalk between nuclear and mitochondrial organelles. In fact, mitochondria, a complex structure of about 1200 protein weave, can synergistically and cooperatively orchestrates with nucleus, to generate energy production as well as regulate many intracellular metabolic pathways in response to aging signal, oncogenic stimuli and/or metabolic stress. In this workshop, with the theme of "synergy between nucleus and mitochondria", we focus on pioneering research and researchers attempting to elucidate the disease pathophysiology through new approaches, genetics, single cell analysis, localizatome, and SWATH-MS analysis. From the technical viewpoint of multi-omics, genetics and molecular biological analysis, we would like to deepen discussions with you about the new possibilities that will open up about the forefront of molecular biology of "life-aging-disease-death".

1AW-11 December 2 (Wed) AM
Quantitative understanding and manipulation of cell fate dynamics
Co-hosted by: Integrated Analysis and Regulation of Cellular Diversity
Organizer
IWAMI, Shingo (Kyushu University), TASAKI, Sohei (Kyoto University)
Detail

A large number of cells having different functions co-organizes individual and "systems" created by these cells maintain homeostasis from various internal and external stimuli and disorders. It is thought that the destabilization or breakdown of the system leads to aging and disease. At present, with the development of cutting-edge technology such as single-cell analysis and imaging techniques and gene editing technology, we are able to analyze specific cells and organs individually. However, in order to understand the system and to obtain novel insights, we require a development of data analysis technology based on mathematical models and computer simulation coupling with these cutting-edge technologies. In this workshop, we will introduce our current interdisciplinary studies.

1AW-12 December 2 (Wed) AM
Biological basis for innovative biomaterials
Organizer
HAYASHI, Shigeo (RIKEN), YOSHIOKA, Shinya (Tokyo University of Science)
Detail

Living organisms have evolved a variety of surface functions including selective light reflection (structural color) and water super repellency (lotus effect). Those functions are realized by fine-tuned surface nano-structures consisting of cellulose, chitin or keratin, and inspired engineers to create novel biomimetic products. In this work shop we discuss biological principles underlying the formation of surface nanostructures and their evolutionary refinement.

1AW-13 December 2 (Wed) AM
Towards the understanding of central dogma in biological chirality
Organizer
YAJIMA, Junichiro, (The University of Tokyo), MATSUNO, Kenji (Osaka University)
Detail

An object is chiral if it cannot be superposed onto its mirror image. In biological science, chirality appears hierarchically from molecules to body structures. However, it has been difficult to find links between the molecule and body chirality. Recent studies demonstrate that the chirality of actin and tubulin molecules is the ultimate origins of body chirality. Here, we define such causal relations between molecular and body chirality as central dogma of biological chirality and would like to integratedly discuss it.

1AW-14 December 2 (Wed) AM
Adaptive evolution and genome-wide analysis of fish and insects
Organizer
OMORI, Yoshihiro (Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology), NIKAIDO, Masato (Tokyo Institute of Technology)
Detail

Attention has been focused on studying the unique evolution of "minor" organisms that have not been elucidated in the study of major model organisms at the genetic level. However, there are many difficulties such as insufficient genomic information of these organisms and difficulty of experimental sampling of individuals for these studies. In this session, researchers from teleost fish and insects will talk about their studies which analyzed from a novel perspective. We would like to discuss this with the novel insight into these projects.

1AW-15 December 2 (Wed) AM
Organelle Quality Control - autoregulation of organelle quality and capacity
Organizer
MORI, Kazutoshi (Kyoto University), YOSHIDA, Hiderou (University of Hyogo)
Detail

Both the quality and the capacity of each organelle are tightly regulated according to cellular demands by the mechanism of organelle quality control (organelle QC), which is one of fundamental issues in cell biology, although it has not been studied extensively except for nuclear QC (i.e. cell cycle). In this workshop, speakers and audience will discuss on organelle QC of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, peroxisomes, lysosomes and secretory vesicles.

1AW-16 December 2 (Wed) AM
Formation and regulation of cell-cell adhesion: from the viewpoint of uniformity and variability
Organizer
IKENOUCHI, Junichi (Kyushu University), ODA, Yukako (Kyoto University)
Detail

Multicellular organisms are constructed by various types of cell-cell adhesions. Recently, the studies about how cell-cell adhesion molecules assemble and function as a platform for cell signaling have been conducted intensively. In addition, it has become clear that cell-cell adhesion is regulated by numerous factors including membrane lipids, post-translational modifications and so on. This workshop will focus on the epithelial cell-cell adhesion, neural /immunological synapses, and we will discuss recent advances and future directions in this field.

1AW-17 December 2 (Wed) AM
New Trends and Fundamental Technologies for Microbial Ecosystems
Organizer
SASAKI, Nobuo (Keio University), FUKUDA, Shinji (Keio University)
Detail

The field of microbiology has been changing with the development of new technologies such as using next-generation sequencer or microfluidics. In previous study, functional bacterium has been isolated and cultured to understand its function individually. However, the recent trends to reveal symbiotic relationship between host and bacteria (microbial ecosystem) is that we have captured whole bacteria as a microbiota resided in/on our body. In this workshop, investigators present their state-of-the-art technologies, integrated omics analysis, organoid, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), and mathematical approach which allows controlling microbial ecosystem, and we will discuss the future how to progress this field.

1AW-18 December 2 (Wed) AM
Extracellular fine particles: Where are they from? What are they? and Where are they going?
Organizer
YOSHIDA, Satoshi (Waseda University), IMAMI, Koshi (Kyoto University)
Detail

What are the extracellular fine particles? Extracellular vesicles including exosomes and exogenous fine particles such as PM2.5 are drawing wide attention. However, we still do not fully understand "Where are they from? What are they? and Where are they going?" In this workshop, we discuss mechanisms by which extracellular particles are generated, are transmitted, and induce responses in the host cells. We aim to reassess the physiological impact of extracellular fine particles based on the recent progress in the field with new cutting-edge technologies.

1PW-02 December 2 (Wed) PM
New Era for Translational Control
Organizer
ITO, Takuhiro (RIKEN), INADA, Toshifumi (Tohoku University)
Detail

Translation is not just conversions from mRNA to proteins, but is controlled intricately depending on environment. Recent development of cell biology based on super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, structural biology based on X-ray cryatallography and cryo-EM single-particle analysis, and single-molecule imaging techniques, combined with conventional biochemistry and molecular genetics, has led to the realization of new translation mechanisms. In this workshop, the invited overseas and domestic speakers will present the up-to-date mechanisms of translational control, conducted by many factors of the ribosomes, mRNA, tRNA, translation factors, and their binding factors.

1PW-03 December 2 (Wed) PM
RNA Reincarnation
Organizer
AKIMITSU, Nobuyoshi (The University of Tokyo), HAMADA, Michiaki (Waseda University)
Detail

Classical view of gene expression flow supposes that unidirection of gene regulation; transcription, processing, export, translation, and degradation. However, recent progresses propose that RNA degradation, the most downstream, regulates transcription and epigenetic regulation, the mot upstream. We name this novel regulatory mode as 'RNA reincarnation'. In this workshop, we will give talks related with this new concept.

1PW-04 December 2 (Wed) PM
Unraveling the "chromatin potential" by single-cell analysis
Co-hosted by: MEXT Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Res. on Innovative Areas, Chromatin Potential
Organizer
OCHIAI, Hiroshi (Hiroshima University), HIRATANI, Ichiro (RIKEN)
Detail

Recent omics analyses have revealed the relationship between chromatin modification, genome architecture and gene expression. However, they only provide averaged information and cannot reveal the "chromatin potential (chromatin’s capacity for gene regulation) " in single cells. In this workshop, we will discuss "chromatin potential" based mainly on new findings from single-cell⁄molecule approaches.

1PW-05 December 2 (Wed) PM
A new era of cell division research pioneered by young scientists
Organizer
HATA, Shoji (The University of Tokyo), IEMURA, Kenji (Tohoku University)
Detail

Cell division is an elaborate biological phenomenon consisting of highly organized sequential processes such as chromosome condensation, bipolar spindle formation and chromosome segregation. This workshop puts a spotlight on young scientists who are actively studying these processes. By sharing the latest findings of each process and deepening our comprehensive understanding of the cell division machinery, we hope to build a platform that will stimulate cell division research in Japan.

1PW-06 December 2 (Wed) PM
Small molecules at work!
Organizer
HATTORI, Ayuna (National Cancer Center Research Institute), MIZUKAMI, Akane (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Every living organism utilizes various small molecules not only to build and maintain its body but also to regulate growth, survival, cellular response to stresses and inter-cellular communications. In this Workshop, we’d like to highlight recent works by female scientists studying diverse research areas, from plants to animals, and discuss how various type of bioactive molecules, in particular such as branched chain amino acids, origosaccharide, calcium, function to do their jobs.

1PW-08 December 2 (Wed) PM
Epigenome: How to unravel multidimensional information?
Organizer
HATTORI, Naoko (National Cancer Center Research Institute), UMEHARA, Takashi (RIKEN)
Detail

Epigenomic information exists in a multidimensional state where various chemical modifications are attached onto nucleic acids and chromatin proteins. These pieces of modification information are not independent, and a combination of the modifications leads to the occurrence or correlation of a specific life phenomenon. This workshop introduces the latest epigenomics from technology to biology by domestic and overseas researchers tackling on the detection or control of multidimensional epigenomic information.

1PW-11 December 2 (Wed) PM
Reconstituting human embryonic development - novel tools and exciting perspectives
Organizer
ALEV, Cantas (Kyoto University), SHENG, Guojun (Kumamoto University)
Detail

Our workshop will bring together scientists and experts who are interested in and working on the in vitro reconstitution and analysis of key developmental processes in human and other species. The main focus will be on the in vitro recapitulation and analysis of human embryonic development. Our understanding of human embryonic development is still very limited and hampered by the fact that suitable model systems are largely missing. The organisers and invited (international and national) experts in this new and upcoming field will share their latest results, which we believe will be of interest to many attendies of the upcoming MBSJ-2020 meeting in Kobe.

1PW-12 December 2 (Wed) PM
Diversity of sensory system and its application to human health maintenance
Organizer
TSUDA, Leo (National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology), CHIHARA, Takahiro (Hiroshima University)
Detail

Multicellular organisms have evolved diverse modes of sensory systems to respond to a variety of extracellular stimuli. Each sensory system has acquired unique ways to detect environmental stimuli and contributes to individual behavior and homeostatic maintenance. In this workshop, we will discuss the diversity of sensory systems using model animals such as mice, fly, mosquito and nematode, and also introduce examples of application to virus infection, aging or dementia for the maintenance of human health.

1PW-13 December 2 (Wed) PM
Integrated understanding for function of hematopoietic organs which catch systemic distortion
Organizer
KATAYAMA, Yoshio (Kobe University), KOTANI, Ai (Tokai University)
Detail

Bone marrow has a rich mechanism of organ connection that starts to drive when something is overloaded to the body. However, bone marrow has not been regarded as an organ. In this workshop, we will evolve the existing academic system to understand the function and pathophysiology of whole body through a window called bone marrow by fusing organ association and evolutionary axis.

1PW-14 December 2 (Wed) PM
Frontiers of research on aneuploidy: toward the understanding of the complex pathology of Down syndrome
Organizer
KOBAYASHI, Akiko (Kyoto University), KURABAYASHI, Nobuhiro (University of Toyama)
Detail

Down syndrome (DS), or trisomy 21 is the most common autosomal aneuploidy and is correlated with a variety of health challenges. One of the scientific goals is to understand the molecular basis of the unique combination of risk (and resiliencies) from multiple aspects. In this workshop, we invite leading scientists studying the DS pathology and chromosomal dynamics, and would like to discuss the possible development of therapies.

1PW-15 December 2 (Wed) PM
Metabolic and Physiological Regulators of Organismal Longevity
Organizer
OBATA, Fumiaki (The University of Tokyo), FUKUYAMA, Masamitsu (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Model organisms have contributed to the understanding of metabolic responsive pathways that govern organismal longevity. The workshop shall identify Metabolic and mechanistic regulators of physiological ageing. It aims to meet the researchers studying ageing in yeast, worms and flies and elucidate the evolutionally-conserved mechanisms determining organismal lifespan.

1PW-16 December 2 (Wed) PM
Alternate Routes to Cope with Chromosome Breakage: Mechanism and Significance
Organizer
TAKATA, Kei-ichi (Institute for Basic Science), ADACHI, Noritaka (Yokohama City University)
Detail

Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are the two major DSB repair pathways. In the absence of NHEJ or HR, DSBs are still repaired by alternative DSB repair pathways. Alternative DSB repair pathways are promising targets for cancer therapy, because inhibition of those pathways can sensitize HR-defective cancer cells. In addition, novel mechanisms to cope with unusual DSBs have been identified. We will discuss the importance of those pathways to maintain chromosome stability in this workshop.

1PW-17 December 2 (Wed) PM
New developments in molecular evolutionary anthropology
Organizer
OOTA, Hiroki (The University of Tokyo), KAWAMURA, Shoji (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

In recent years, molecular biology research on human evolution, such as the archaic human genome analysis, the subsequent analysis of ancient methylomes, and establishing of apes iPS cells, has been rapidly and novelly developed in recent years. In this workshop, young researchers from Japan and abroad will introduce the newest technology-based approaches to elucidating the evolutionary history of primates, ancient humans, and modern humans, and discuss new developments.

1PW-18 December 2 (Wed) PM
Establishment and maintenance of epithelial order - mechanics, morphogenesis, and physiology
Organizer
HIGASHI, Tomohito (Fukushima Medical University), OTANI, Tetsuhisa (National Institute for Physiological Sciences)
Detail

Epithelial cells form cell junctions and communicate with each other to establish epithelial order. We are beginning to understand how epithelial cells organize cell junctions to couple with each other to form functional organs, and how epithelial homeostasis is maintained. In this workshop, we will provide a platform to discuss the cutting-edge topics in epithelial biology in a multidisciplinary manner.

2AW-02 December 3 (Thu) AM
Decoding and Engineering Cell Shape
Organizer
WANG, Yu-Chiun (RIKEN), MOORE, Adrian (RIKEN)
Detail

Using examples from work in range of model organisms, this workshop will address what are the effector mechanism that decode the shape of individual cells from genetic information. It will further show how the understanding of these mechanisms are used to create new cellular engineering tools that manipulate cell shape in vivo to study cellular migration and patterning processes.

2AW-03 December 3 (Thu) AM
Workshop on Nuclear Pore Complex: Molecular Cell Biology, Diseases and Nanotechnology
Organizer
WONG, Richard (Kanazawa University), IMAMOTO, Naoko (RIKEN)
Detail

The Workshop on Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) will provide an interdisciplinary forum for researches from different disciplines, from cell biology and bio-chemistry to bioinformatics and computational modelling to talk over both basic and applied aspects of the transport through the NPC. Transport takes place through the central channel of the NPC, which is tightly packed with nucleoporins containing intrinsically disordered phenylalanine and glycine repeats (FGNups). FGNups form the permeability barrier of the NPC; i.e., they avert the flux of unmotivated macromolecules and only permit passage of larger cargoes that are bound to a nuclear transport receptor (NTR, also called importins, exportins or karyopherins). NTRs interact with FG motifs of central channel FGNups through multiple low-affinity binding motifs and thus rapidly cross the NPC, along with their bound cargo, recent studies indicating FGNups caught in the act of liquid liquid phase separation (LLPS). Particular focus of the workshop will be to foster the application of nano imaging devices (e.g. STED, HS-AFM)application to investigate the interaction between experimental and theoretical approaches aimed for relating NPC dynamic structure to its function, and understanding mechanisms of the selectivity of transport through the NPC.

2AW-05 December 3 (Thu) AM
Biological fate determination by multidimensional genomic changes
Organizer
MIYOSHI, Tomoichiro (Kyoto University), KUROIWA, Asato (Hokkaido University)
Detail

Recent advances in genome sequencing technologies have demonstrated that genomic diversity contributes to evolution of various organisms. However, it remains unclear how genomic reorganizations by partial or whole genome duplication, translocation, or transposons lead to genomic diversity and drive speciation. Here, we will focus on a wide range of species, and discuss the multidimensional genomic changes during evolution.

2AW-06 December 3 (Thu) AM
Coordination and mis-coordination between DNA replication, transcription and chromosome structure
Organizer
TSUBOUCHI, Tomomi (National Institute for Basic Biology), YOSHIOKA, Ken-ichi (National Cancer Center Research Institute)
Detail

DNA, blueprint for life, serves as a platform for many biological events including DNA replication and transcription in association with chromosome-structure regulation. Coordination betwen these events is essential for accurately maintaining genetic integrity. Although each individual regulation has been well studied, how these coordinate with one another, still remains unclear. In this session, we will gather speakers working on various biological events that affect genome stability and discuss their elaborate coordination mechanisms and potential miscoordination.

2AW-07 December 3 (Thu) AM
Inter-organ communication in skeletal muscle physiology and disease
Organizer
MATSUZAKI, Kyoko (Tokyo Medical and Dental University), HIRABAYASHI, Susumu (Imperial College London)
Detail

Skeletal muscle is a central metabolic organ whose function is regulated by communication with distant organs such as adipose tissue, liver, and brain. While muscle-secreted factors are known to have far-reaching effects on the physiology of other organs, how muscle physiology is impacted by systemic metabolic changes induced by diet, exercise and ageing is relatively poorly understood. This workshop brings together scientists interested in the inter-organ regulation of muscle homeostasis. We will discuss how skeletal muscle physiology is modulated by metabolic factors (diet, animal metabolism, and ageing), other organs, and diseases, such as organ failure and cancer.

2AW-08 December 3 (Thu) AM
Principles in the symmetry breaking in animal and plant development
Organizer
SATO, Yutaka (National Institute of Genetics), KIMURA, Akatsuki (National Institute of Genetics)
Detail

In both animals and plants, organization of multicellular body requires the breakage of symmetry at various aspects of development to produce asymmetry, which can be utilized as a polarity cue to establish a developmental axis. Thus, the breakage of symmetry, followed by the maintenance and recognition of asymmetry, is universal process for development of body, organ and tissue system, and for cellular differentiation. However, its mechanism is analyzed using diverse species including both animals and plants and is focused on various developmental events. In this workshop, six topics on the varieties of symmetry breakage in both plants and animals will be introduced and will provide an opportunity to discuss possible principles in the symmetry breaking in animal and plant development.

2AW-11 December 3 (Thu) AM
Impact of Biological Clock: Emergence, Regulation, and State Dynamics
Organizer
YAGITA, Kazuhiro (Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine), FUKADA, Yoshitaka (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Time is not the substance but the invisible concept. However, biological organisms exactly utilize the time information through the circadian clock to control and maintain the state of biological functions. Circadian clock not only provides day-night changes of physiology but also regulates orderly reactions of homeo-dynamics in the living organisms. Therefore, impairment or immature circadian clock often leads to unstable or inappropriate physiological processes, and even pathological consequences. In this session, we would like to introduce and discuss about the impact of circadian clock upon the "state dynamics" and its biological implications.

2AW-12 December 3 (Thu) AM
Molecular basis of disease development triggered by environmental exposure
Organizer
TAKESHIMA, Hideyuki (National Cancer Center Research Institute), SATO, Noriko (Tokyo Medical and Dental University)
Detail

Our body responds to various environmental stimuli by operating the homeostatic maintenance system. However, enhanced or prolonged stimuli disrupt the regulatory mechanism, causing genomic/epigenomic alterations and changes in cellular composition within a tissue. Such changes grow, transform, and accumulate over time, leading to developing various diseases, such as cancers. In this workshop, we will deepen our understanding of this process by sorting molecular events along the time axis.

2AW-13 December 3 (Thu) AM
Next-generation nutritional science driven by a variety of animal models
Organizer
TAKAHASHI, Shin-ichiro (The University of Tokyo), MIYAMOTO, Takafumi (University of Tsukuba)
Detail

Nutrients are multifunctional molecules that are essential for the smooth operation of biological systems. As such, elucidating their dynamics and functionality is crucial to fully understand the functional principles of life. This workshop aims to provide attendees with an expansive view of animal models in nutritional science as a solid foundation for the next generation of research in this field. This will be accomplished by surveying the latest findings on mechanisms of nutrient regulation in living systems, and technologies and experimental techniques that can lend insights into nutrient pathways and other complex information networks.

2AW-14 December 3 (Thu) AM
Current perspectives on hibernation and torpor in mammals
Organizer
YAMAGUCHI, Yoshifumi (Hokkaido University), SUNAGAWA, Genshiro (RIKEN)
Detail

Torpor is an adaptive strategy for cutting thermogenesis off, which allows animals to persist in cold environments with seasonal or unpredictable decreases in food availability. During hibernation, a seasonal and drastic form of torpor, small-bodied mammalian hibernators undergo multiple cycles of normothermic periodic arousal and multiday hypothermic deep torpor characterized by the profound suppression of metabolism, body temperature, heart rate, food intake, and locomotive activity. However, little is known about mechanisms that enable hibernation and torpor in mammals. The aim of this symposium is to bring the latest knowledge of hibernation and torpor together into a broad audience.

2AW-15 December 3 (Thu) AM
Diverse functions embedded in "ubiquitin code"
Co-hosted by: Ubiquitin New Frontier Driven by Chemo-technologies
Organizer
OIKAWA, Daisuke (Osaka City University), TAKAHASHI, Hirotaka (Ehime University)
Detail

Ubiquitination is a crucial post-translational modification in all eukaryotic cells, which regulates numerous cellular functions, such as proteasomal degradation, endocytosis, DNA repair, and signal transduction. In this workshop, young researchers will introduce recent advances in the diversity and biology of protein ubiquitination, so-called "ubiquitin code", from the viewpoint of molecular basis, physiological functions, and disease relevance.

2AW-16 December 3 (Thu) AM
Advances of zinc signal study by integration of zinc biology and chemistry
Organizer
FUKADA, Toshiyuki (Tokushima Bunri University), KAMBE, Taiho (Kyoto University)
Detail

Zinc is an essential trace element for life. Its homeostasis is regulated by zinc transporters, and zinc ion via transporters plays in many cellular events as signaling factor, called "Zinc signal". In this workshop, we at first will introduce the activities of International Society for Zinc Biology (ISZB) and Japanese Society of Zinc Nutritional Therapy (JZNT), then address recent findings of method development and drug discovery with new comers from chemistry field, together with senior members of ISZB and JZNT. We will also discuss and share the future goals of "Zinc biology" as an emerging life science research field.

2AW-17 December 3 (Thu) AM
Phase Separation Wonderland and the End of "Classical" Molecular Biology
Organizer
MORI, Eiichiro (Nara Medical University), MATSUURA, Akira (Chiba University)
Detail

Lines of evidence have accumulated that modes of subcellular assembly of macromolecules, mediated through liquid-liquid phase separation, are relevant to diverse physiological regulations. However, previous studies were a kind of phenomenology, sorely describing the event in each particular case. In this workshop, we will discuss the new phase of molecular biology, provided by the integrated view of biological processes driven by phase separation.

2AW-18 December 3 (Thu) AM
Drug development targeting protein phosphatases based on the molecular function
Organizer
OHAMA, Takashi (Yamaguchi University ), CHUMAN, Yoshiro (Niigata University)
Detail

Proteins phosphorylation controls almost all biological processes, and the abnormal regulation is involved in various diseases including cancer. Phosphorylation is dynamically regulated by both kinases and phosphatases, however, the functions of phosphatases are less understood, partly because of their complex regulation. In this workshop, we will introduce novel function of phosphatases and discuss future prospects of drug development targeting phosphatases through the cross-disciplinary approaches.

2PW-01 December 3 (Thu) PM
Where are we headed next to deciphering RNA-binding protein regulatory world
Organizer
TAKEUCHI, Akihide (Kyoto University), ITO, Takahiro (Kyoto University)
Detail

RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) consist huge family > 1500 molecules and recent studies are revealing significant roles of RBPs in gene expression machinery. In this workshop, we will introduce how experts are challenging to understand functionality of RBPs in regulating gene expression, chromatin structure, phase separation, transcription, or cellular differentiation & functions, leading to future direction to decipher RNA-binding protein regulatory world.

2PW-02 December 3 (Thu) PM
Elucidation of divergent biological programs generated by disordered regions
"Intrinsically Disordered Region (IDR)", non-structured protein in molecular biological investigations
Organizer
KUROKAWA, Riki (Saitama Medical University), SHIINA, Nobuyuki (ExCELLS, National Institute for Basic Biology)
Detail

IDR, found in divergent proteins like RNA-binding proteins, induces phase separation and regulates higher cellular functions. Mutations in IDR induce diseases. Eukaryotes utilize IDR for their functions differing from prokaryotes, but take a risk. Then, we analyze IDR for its evolution and functions at the cellular and individual levels from points of views of bioinformatics, structural and molecular biology, embryology and neurobiology, with discussion of the risk.

2PW-04 December 3 (Thu) PM
Ladies and more ladies; unite like chromatin for forefront of biology
Organizer
KANOH, Junko (The University of Tokyo), OKADA, Yuki (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Chromatin research has becoming a big trend encompassing a wide range of research fields from theoretical biology to clinical application. However, despite the fact that there must be many female researchers working in these fields, there are not many opportunities to hear their research at conferences at present. In this workshop, we will introduce a wide range of forefront research talks; from single molecule to higher-order brain function in mammals, presented by a variety of female researchers from young PI to world-renowned directors. We hope it will be an opportunity for young female researchers to develop their career path and establish research networks just like nucleosomes chaining together to form chromatin, nuclei, and life. Please join us regardless of your gender and age.

2PW-05 December 3 (Thu) PM
Understanding the Genome Stress Response as a Cellular Risk Management System
Organizer
FURUYA, Kanji (Kyoto University), IIDA, Tetsushi (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Cellular activities are constantly maintained through the interplay between the different metabolic system. As a whole cellular system, we can speculate that various interplay exists in both microscopic and macroscopic environment. But it is not well understood that what sort of the interplay between this constant cellular activities and unexpected events such as genome DNA damages. At this workshop, we gather the researchers who study from either constant cellular activities field or from DNA damage response field. And we will try to understand the cellular risk management system from the interplay between various basic cellular activities and DNA damages, and will find out a universal rule that underlies in different interplays.

2PW-06 December 3 (Thu) PM
High-precision genome sequences of nonhuman primates and the application to human disease modeling
Organizer
EMA, Masatsugu (Shiga University of Medical Science), KAWAI, Jun (RIKEN)
Detail

Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are expected to phenocopy human diseases more faithfully than rodents, because they share highly similar anatomical and physiological features. However, genomic sequences of NHPs have been poorly assembled, resulting in hampering human disease modeling with NHPs. In this workshop, we present recent efforts on high-precision genome sequences for marmoset and cynomolgus monkey, and the application to human disease modeling with iPSCs and genetically modified NHPs.

2PW-07 December 3 (Thu) PM
p53 family, isoforms and ubiquitination in development, inflammation, hypoxia and cancer
Organizer
CANDEIAS, Marco (Kyoto University / National Health Institute Portugal), OHKI, Rieko (National Cancer Center Japan)
Detail

p53 family members and isoforms share roles in development, inflammation, hypoxia and cancer, as observed in studies using human cell lines and tissues, mouse models and fish models. How these roles are shared exactly is not clear. Interestingly, many of these phenomena are regulated by ubiquitination, which controls p53 proteins' stability, cellular localization and function. Here, world experts in these fields will gather and make efforts to understand (and explain) these recent processes of p53 biology.

2PW-08 December 3 (Thu) PM
How does genome reorganization drive adaptive evolution?
Organizer
SASAKI, Eriko (Kyushu University), HIROTA, Toru (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research)
Detail

How is genome reorganization involved in environmental adaptation under natural selection? Although drastic changes of genome structure such as chromosomal fusion and polyploidization have been implicated in the evolution of living systems, the evolutionary processes and the molecular mechanisms supporting the drastic genomic changes remain unclear. To address this, in this workshop, we discuss the latest topics about genome reorganization underlying adaptive evolution.

2PW-11 December 3 (Thu) PM
Organelle communication and neuronal homeostasis
Organizer
SHIRANE, Michiko (Nagoya City University), SESAKI, Hiromi (Johns Hopkins University)
Detail

Defects in organelle homeostasis leads to several diseases, such as neurological disorders. Organelles do not function independently but rather communicate with the ER network through membrane contact sites (MCSs), which are involved in intracellular functions such as lipid transport, calcium ion regulation, and organelle dynamics. In this session, we discuss the latest findings on MCSs and organelle dynamics focusing on the underlying mechanisms for neuronal homeostasis.

2PW-12 December 3 (Thu) PM
Accelerating life sciences and drug discovery through whole-animal chemical biology
Organizer
SONOSHITA, Masahiro (Hokkaido University), DODO, Kosuke (RIKEN)
Detail

Recent studies made remarkable progress in life sciences such as elucidating the process of pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. However, drug development that contributes to prevention and/or treatment for the diseases remains still challenging due to emerging toxicity and other problems despite extensive efforts. This workshop aims to advance the field by sharing and discussing the latest achievements made by cutting-edge researchers working with novel whole animal/plant disease models combined with chemical biology.

2PW-13 December 3 (Thu) PM
Elucidating nutrient functions using multilevel approaches
Organizer
HINO, Shinjiro (Kumamoto University), KAMEI, Yasutomi (Kyoto Prefectural University)
Detail

Nutrients serve as energy sources and body constituents, thereby contributing to homeostasis. Recent studies have revealed new functions of nutrients in specific tissues and under particular conditions (i.e., disease or aging). In this workshop, we will share research progress on different aspects of nutrient science including absorption, sensing, transcriptional regulation and cell modulation.

2PW-14 December 3 (Thu) PM
New molecular insights into the mechanism of failure of complex organs, exemplified by the kidney
Organizer
NISHIYAMA, Akira (Kagawa University), KUME, Shinji (Shiga University of Medical Science)
Detail

No definitive treatment method exists for organ damage owing to the complexity of organ failure and the presence of a multitude of factors in its pathology. Among the affected organs, the kidney is a complex organ composed of more than 20 different types of cells, and there is no fundamental treatment for many kidney diseases. Due to this, the Japanese Society of Nephrology has tasked their entire organization with the aim of elucidating the molecular pathophysiology of kidney disease, a disease affecting the nation. In this workshop, we will introduce young researchers' work showcasing new molecular insights into the mechanism of failure of complex organs, exemplified by the kidney, leading to the application of the research findings to other organs.

2PW-16 December 3 (Thu) PM
From the vascular formation and the mechanism of functional maintenance to new role
Sponsored by: The Japanese Vascular Biology and Medicine Organization
Organizer
YOSHIDA, Masayuki (Tokyo Medical and Dental University), OIKE, Yuichi (Kumamoto University)
Detail

The vasculatures expanding in whole body is an essential organ to maintain various biological function and homeostasis. Therefore, the dysfunction of vasculatures leads to lethal disease such as cardiovascular disease, cancers, immune disease. However, it remains unknown in the mechanisms of vasculatures formation and homeostasis. In this workshop, we introduce the study of biology of vasculatures using the novel technology and hope that we can get an active discussion from everyone for this discussion topic.

2PW-17 December 3 (Thu) PM
Redefinition and reconsideration of "virus"
Organizer
SATO, Kei (The University of Tokyo), NAKAGAWA, So (Tokai University)
Detail

We human beings suffer from a global problem, "pandemic" of emerging/re-emerging viruses, such as 2019-nCoV and Ebola viruses. The problem caused by emerging/re-emerging viruses is considered a concern of "Sustainable Development Goals" by United Nations. There are a variety of pathogenic viruses, however, the only virus infection that we could succeed to eradicate is smallpox virus infection. In other words, the other viruses cannot be eradicated and will keep circulating and pathogenic in the world. In contrast to such pathogenic viruses, we now know some viruses are integrated and endogenized in our genome. Viral elements including transposons occupy almost half of our genome, and some of them function as transcriptional elements or genes themselves. Altogether, these insights indicate that viruses and their hosts have co-evolved from the birth of the earth, and will do in the future.Namely, "virus" has various faces - as a pathogen spreading in the hosts and as an element assimilated the hosts. What is "virus"? Why does "virus" exist? In this workshop, we reconsider the multiple behaviors of the virus and redefine it.

2PW-18 December 3 (Thu) PM
The architectural style of the body depending on the physical properties of the materials
Organizer
KURODA, Junpei (Osaka University), FUNAYAMA, Noriko (Kyoto University)
Detail

When building a house, the construction method changes depending on materials (timber, brick, steel frame) selected. This is because the method of construction depends on the physical properties of the material and also applies to the cells that make up the body. The rigidity of bodies and organs is maintained not by cells themselves but by extracellular physical materials (calcium carbonate, silica, collagen, chitin, etc.) and the "shape" is determined by how these materials are assembled. In this session, we will discuss new morphogenesis logic that can be seen by replacing the main subject of morphogenesis in the extracellular matrix as a material.

3AW-02 December 4 (Fri) AM
Bacterial population genomics: impacts of thousands of (epi)genomes within a species on analysis of the microbiome-human ecosystem
Organizer
CAMARGO, Maria Constanza (National Cancer Institute, NIH), KOBAYASHI, Ichizo (The University of Tokyo / Kyorin University / SOKENDAI)
Detail

A human body is an ecosystem made of cells with human genome and an equal number of cells with bacterial genomes. Why and how can the bacteria-human symbiosis persist? Why and how does it sometimes lead to diseases? The population genomic methods comparing hundreds of genomes to relate a specific function to molecules are now applied to genomes of each bacterial species. With the population (epi)genomic approach, we address these questions for H. pylori and gastric (stomach) cancer. For this, several international projects are now going on. The topics here include genome phylogeny, genome geography, GWAS (genome-wide association study), protein structure micro-evolution, molecular evolution theory involving methylated bases, and epigenome micro-evolution.

3AW-03 December 4 (Fri) AM
Evolution of proteomics-based databases and their cross-sectional use in life science research
Organizer
ARAKI, Norie (Kumamoto University), UEDA, Koji (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research)
Detail

Advances in innovative proteomics technologies have produced a large scale of global information of protein structure and function worldwide. Utilizing them as resources, extraction of important molecules related to biological phenomena and application to the basic research have become possible with the evolution of bioinformatics. This workshop introduces the evolution and utilization of Uniprot which is the most widely used protein database in the world by the developer (EMBL/EBI), and the development and application of Japan Proteome DB: jPOST. Integration analysis with various databases such as post-translational modification, genome, network and their cross-sectional utilization will be also introduced.

3AW-05 December 4 (Fri) AM
Neural progenitor cells produce brain structure and evolution-their functions and molecular basis
Organizer
ARIMURA, Nariko (National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry), KAWAUCHI, Takeshi (Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe)
Detail

The development of the brain requires that a limited number of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) produce a great number of neurons with a large diversity. Recently, the metabolism and morphological changes of NPCs have been reported to be keys to "fate determination" and "evolution of the brain". In this workshop, researchers analyzing the function of NPCs and neurons in terms of morphological change, functional evolution and fate determination, will gather to discuss new molecular bases of neurogenesis for deepening our understanding of brain development and evolution.

3AW-06 December 4 (Fri) AM
Principles of morphogenesis beyond molecular biology
Organizer
INAKI, Mikiko (Osaka University), SATO, Makoto (Kanazawa University)
Detail

Tissues and their constituent cells are shaped not only by gene expression and molecular interactions, but also by physical mechanisms. In this workshop, we try to elucidate the mechanism of morphogenesis using the latest technologies such as live imaging, microdevices, and simulations using various species and soft matters. This workshop is expected to create new collaborations that solve real problems of morphogenesis.

3AW-07 December 4 (Fri) AM
The New Era of Developmental Biology Opening with the Cooperation of Embryology and Stem Cell Science
Organizer
IKEYA, Makoto (Kyoto University), SASAI, Noriaki (Nara Institute of Science and Technology)
Detail

The stem cells have recently been spotlighted because of their usefulness, but developmental biological knowledge is indispensable for accurately understanding their properties and the mode of differentiation. Conversely, successful use of stem cells has made it possible to clarify the principles of development that were difficult in in vivo experimental systems. In this workshop, we will discuss the latest findings by focusing on the elucidation of the principles of development using stem cells or research on stem cell science using developmental biological findings.

3AW-08 December 4 (Fri) AM
A new frontier in stress-responsive signal transduction
Organizer
TOKUNAGA, Fuminori (Osaka City University), NAKAI , Akira (Yamaguchi University)
Detail

Living organisms are constantly subjected to various stress invasions. They must maintain homeostasis by controlling gene expression through signal transduction pathways. Moreover, the failure of the system involves multiple disorders. In this workshop, we will introduce the latest knowledges on the cellular mechanisms and disorders induced by stress-responsive signal transduction and transcriptional pathways, such as heat shock, osmotic stress, MAP kinase, and NF-κB, and discuss the current trends in signal transduction research.

3AW-11 December 4 (Fri) AM
Pathogenic defect and chemical manipulation of RNA processing
Organizer
AJIRO, Masahiko (Kyoto University), KAIDA, Daisuke (University of Toyama)
Detail

RNA processing is a fundamental biological step to create proteomic diversity in higher eukaryotes, and its defect is associated with various pathological consequences. This workshop spotlights novel insights on RNA processing, discovered through next generation sequencing, bioinformatic approaches, and its manipulation by small molecule compounds, aiming a comprehensive discussion for RNA processing from pathogenesis to chemical regulation.

3AW-12 December 4 (Fri) AM
Biology of soft biomolecules
Organizer
YAMAZAKI, Tomohiro (Hokkaido University), NAKAGAWA, Shinichi (Hokkaido University)
Detail

Increasing amount of evidence indicates the prevalence of intrinsically disordered proteins and lncRNAs in living organisms, which exhibit unique functional properties via multivalent molecular interactions with moderate specificity. In this workshop, we discuss the functions of "super-disordered proteins" entirely consisting of disordered regions, as well as phase-separated non-membranous cellular bodies built on lncRNAs.

3AW-13 December 4 (Fri) AM
Extracellular rigidity directs cell behaviors: from physico-molecular mechanism for rigidity sensing to biochemical signaling for cellular responses
Organizer
HIRATA, Hiroaki (Nagoya University), DEGUCHI, Shinji (Osaka University)
Detail

Rigidity of extracellular environments is one of the dominant factors that direct cell behaviors. However, the physico-molecular mechanism and signaling pathways for cells to detect and respond to the intangible physical quantity 'rigidity' remain largely unclear. In this workshop, we share cutting-edge studies tackling these questions, and discuss what remains to be solved for depicting an entire picture of the rigidity-dependent regulation of cell functions.

3AW-14 December 4 (Fri) AM
Challenge to the integrative understanding of morphogenesis, regeneration, aging, and diseases in musculoskeletal system
Organizer
KIKUCHI, Yutaka (Hiroshima University), UEZUMI, Akiyoshi (Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology)
Detail

Musculoskeletal system, mainly composed of skeletal muscle, tendon, ligament, and bone, is the largest organ in the human body, and is critical for supporting body, protecting internal organs and tissues, and controlling movement. However, our understanding of the morphogenesis, regeneration, aging, and disease processes of the musculoskeletal system is still insufficient. In our workshop, we aim at the integrative understanding of the musculoskeletal system by introducing the latest research on musculoskeletal components.

3AW-15 December 4 (Fri) AM
Chromosome/chromatin/nuclear dynamics in sexual reproduction
Organizer
ISHIGURO, Kei-ichiro (Kumamoto University), NAMEKAWA, Satoshi (UC Davis)
Detail

Sexual reproduction accompanies specific changes in chromosome, chromatin, and nuclear dynamics over broad range of species. In this workshop, we will discuss on chromosome/chromatin/nuclear dynamics from different aspects of sexual reproduction, such as germ cell differentiation, meiosis, sex determination, and fertilization.

3AW-16 December 4 (Fri) AM
De novo genes: Biological functions created by newborn genes
Organizer
MORIYA, Hisao (Okayama University), MAKINO, Takashi (Tohoku University)
Detail

It has long been thought that new genes are evolved from pre-existing genes through duplication or rearrangement. However, recently genes newly created from non-coding genomic regions, i.e. "de novo genes", are successively reported. Moreover, as the importance of de novo genes used to characterize each species has been recognized, the paradigm that evolutionally-conserved genes only perform important functions is changing. In this workshop, we will introduce emerging studies about de novo genes, and discuss the future of the newborn de novo gene research.

3AW-17 December 4 (Fri) AM
Intestinal environment regulates circuit in aging, nutrients, and immune defense
Co-hosted by: Japan Society for Biomedical Gerontology
Organizer
MARUYAMA, Mitsuo (National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology), SHIMIZU, Takahiko (National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology)
Detail

Various environments are formed in the intestine depending on nutrients ingested, intestinal bacteria, and host diversity. In recent years, it has been found that such various environments have a great effect not only on nutrient absorption but also on immune defense represented by innate immunity as well as on aging and age-related diseases. In this workshop, we would like to have the top runners from Japan and world give lectures and introduce the latest research findings. This workshop will be co-hosted with the Japan Society for Biomedical Gerontology.

3AW-18 December 4 (Fri) AM
Frontiers of nucleoid DNA replication and quality control
Organizer
KASHO, Kazutoshi (Umea University), KATAYAMA, Tsutomu (Kyushu University)
Detail

Closed circular form of DNA is an evolutionally conserved nature in bacterial/archaeal genomes and eukaryotic organelle genomes. These circular DNAs form unique ʹnucleoidʹ structure rather than super-dense eukaryotic ʹchromatinʹ structure, which underlie genome replication and maintenance systems. In this workshop, we are eager to summarize current knowledge on various species to understand the common mechanism of circular genome maintenance.

3AW-19 December 4 (Fri) AM
Understanding of health and disease in cell, tissue, and organ systems based on cytoskeletal dynamics
Organizer
KAWAUCHI, Keiko (Konan University), YOSHINO, Daisuke (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology)
Detail

Cytoskeleton dynamics possess a close connection with not only cell morphology and motility, but also molecular signal cascades and organelle functions. However, we have an incomplete understanding of when, where, and how the cytoskeletal molecules regulate multiple cellular functions. In this workshop, we will introduce and discuss cutting-edge studies regarding the link between cytoskeletal dynamics, health, and disease at all levels including cells, tissues, and organ systems.

3PW-01 December 4 (Fri) PM
Cell Fate Conversion by innovative RNA modulation
Organizer
SUZUKI, Kentaro (Wakayama Medical University), MATSUMOTO, Masahito (Tokyo Medical and Dental University)
Detail

Recent development of RNA technologies has uncovered a variety of molecular insights and functions in biology and onset of human diseases. This workshop focuses upon RNA modulation resulting in cell fate conversion including organogenesis, metabolic function, reprogramming, and therapies of human diseases. We will share recent progresses of the research on Cell Fate Conversion by RNA modulation.

3PW-02 December 4 (Fri) PM
Facilitating the use of Drosophila in clinical and translational biomedical research
Organizer
YAMAMOTO, Shinya (Baylor College of Medicine), SAITO, Kuniaki (National Institute of Genetics)
Detail

The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a classic model organism in the fields of genetics, developmental biology, immunology and neuroscience. In recent years and in many countries, there are increasing number of researchers that are starting to use flies for clinical and translational research. In this workshop, we will introduce the role of Drosophila researchers in biomedical research, and further discuss how we can facilitate the collaborations between clinicians and model organism researchers nationally as well as internationally to promote interdisciplinary research programs on a global scale.

3PW-03 December 4 (Fri) PM
AMED-CREST/PRIME「Mechanobiology」
「Challenges to unravel mechano-signals for muscle weakness」
Supported by: AMED
Organizer
SATO, Takahiko (Fujita Health University), HARA, Yuji (Kyoto University)
Detail

Although skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body and highly organized tissue designed to produce force for various movement, it has been known that the loss of skeletal muscle mass causes by immobility, aging, malnutrition, injuries or diseases, and leads to muscle weakness and causes disability problems. To tackle these problems, we would like to introduce novel mechanisms to induce muscular atrophies and mechano-signals, focusing on myogenic cell membranes or subcellular organelle, and discuss their possibilities for further treatment of muscular atrophy in our workshop.

3PW-04 December 4 (Fri) PM
Molecular basis underlying organismal aging
Organizer
MIURA, Kyoko (Kumamoto University), ISHITANI, Tohru (Osaka University / Gunma University)
Detail

Why do organisms age? Is it possible to realize eternal youth? Even today, these questions remain unclear. However, recent advances in genetics using several animal models, the emergence of new aging research models such as naked mole-rats and turquoise killifish, and cutting-edge omics for supercentenarians and long-lived trees have gradually revealed the common or species-specific molecular basis underlying organismal aging. In this workshop, we will introduce the latest findings in this field and discuss the future of aging research.

3PW-05 December 4 (Fri) PM
Recent advances in molecular and cellular neuroscience
Organizer
KISHI, Yusuke (The University of Tokyo), TAKEUCHI, Haruki (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

A major goal of neuroscience research is to understand how the brain works. Over the past decades, molecular neuroscience has greatly contributed to characterizing developmental events that occur on the timescale of days. However at the moment, we are still far from molecularly understanding principles of neuronal actions, such as changes in membrane potential and neuronal firing, that occur on the millisecond to second timescale. In this workshop, we would like to introduce current topics in molecular neuroscience and discuss what molecular and cellular neuroscience can offer to further understand brain functions.

3PW-06 December 4 (Fri) PM
Cutting edge of current "perivascular cells"
Organizer
YAMAMOTO, Seiji (University of Toyama), ENOMOTO, Atsushi (Nagoya University)
Detail

It has been known that "perivascular cells", e.g. pericytes and perivascular fibroblasts, reside abluminal surface of blood vessels and are considered to contribute to vascular permeability and blood flow regulation, and have been suggested as tissue stem cells. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms with respect to such functions are not fully uncovered yet. In this workshop, based on the current findings utilizing state of the art methods and models, we discuss the significance of perivascular cells.

3PW-07 December 4 (Fri) PM
The extranuclear organelle genomes: the mysterious diversity in their replication, maintenance and genetic organization
Organizer
YASUKAWA, Takehiro (Kyushu University), NISHIMURA, Yoshiki (Kyoto University)
Detail

Mitochondria and chloroplast contain their own genomes. These "extranuclear genomes" have their origins in bacteria and encode genes critical for respiration or photosynthesis. Their replication mechanisms and maintenance are peculiarly diverse, with intriguing features including the high levels of ribonucleotide incorporation and unique genomic evolution. In this workshop, we will challenge to decipher the mysterious diversity of extranuclear genomes across eukaryotic kingdoms and to gain a deeper understanding of the genome.

3PW-08 December 4 (Fri) PM
Integrative approaches to understand biological links between brain aging and age-related diseases
Organizer
KATADA, Sayako (Kyushu University), TODA, Tomohisa (German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases)
Detail

Brain aging is by far the most critical risk factor not only for cognitive decline but also for age-related neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However biological links between brain aging and AD are still unclear due to the complexity of brain aging. In this workshop, we will introduce novel studies to understand brain aging and AD using multi-scale approaches and discuss about possible biological links in between.

3PW-09 December 4 (Fri) PM
Reconstruction of the nucleus - Hierarchical understanding of the functional nucleus by reconstitutional approaches -
Organizer
KURUMIZAKA, Hitoshi (The University of Tokyo), YAMAGATA, Kazuo (Kindai University)
Detail

The "4D Nucleome" project is evolving as a global trend. Once all the elements that make up the nucleus are understood, a functional nucleus can be reconstructed artificially. In this workshop, with a view to this future, researchers who are trying to reconstitute nucleosomes, chromatin, and cell nuclei using various methods such as simulation, in vitro synthesis, artificial nuclei in living cells will be gathered to discuss the construction of nuclear functions.

3PW-10 December 4 (Fri) PM
Toward understanding cellular diversity by single cell analyses and interdisciplinary approaches
Co-hosted by: Integrated analysis and regulation of cellular diversity
Organizer
NAKAJIMA, Yuichiro (Tohoku University), NAKATO, Ryuichiro (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Tissues and organs in vivo are composed of diverse cell populations or "cellular diversity", which enables the robust maintenance of homeostasis, and upon its disruption, leads to diseases. To understand cellular diversity, it is essential to establish interdisciplinary approaches that investigate molecular and cellular dynamics at singe cell level as well as validate functions by constitutive methods. In this workshop, young researchers will introduce recent progresses in our understanding of cellular diversity by integrating single-cell analysis, tissue-clearing, cell lineage analysis, mathematical modeling and engineering approaches.

3PW-11 December 4 (Fri) PM
How does Notch signaling design the life?
Organizer
YAMAKAWA, Tomoko (Osaka University), SHIMOJO, Hiromi (Osaka University)
Detail

The Notch signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved among multicellular organisms and plays important roles in development and homeostasis maintenance. There are also various mechanisms to regulate Notch signaling in each tissue and disruption of these regulatory networks can trigger a variety of diseases. In this workshop, we will introduce how Notch signaling ingenuously controls life using various approaches. We would further like to discuss the next 100 years of Notch signaling research, which has lasted 100 years.

3PW-12 December 4 (Fri) PM
Cellular strategies to overcome stressful conditions -from gene expression to protein function-
Organizer
NAKAYAMA, Koh (Tokyo Medical and Dental University), KATAOKA, Naoyuki (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Organisms are constantly exposed to environmental changes such as oxygen, temperature, or nutrients. These environmental cues induce cellular stress response, which is critical to maintain homeostasis under the stressful conditions. Furthermore, cells utilize such environment to alter its physiological state. In this workshop, we will aim to comprehensively understand the cellular stress response system by broadly overviewing the cellular machinery from gene expression to protein function.

3PW-13 December 4 (Fri) PM
Motility machinery: A mesosystem to bridge single molecule and cellular level functions
Organizer
KOJIMA, Seiji (Nagoya University), FUJIWARA, Ikuko (Osaka City University)
Detail

Living organisms, from bacteria to animals, use motility in response to environmental change to survive. Motility machinery is a quite attractive research subject since it mediates cell function by the ensemble actions of protein components: we can discuss the cell level mechanism based on the insights of components at the molecular level. In this workshop, we will consider the motility machinery as a "mesosystem" that links distinct scales in life (molecule to cell, or even more higher level), and discuss how molecules work in groups and achieve cell motility.

3PW-14 December 4 (Fri) PM
Cell nibble on another!?- Frontieres in "trogocytosis"
Organizer
TSUKUI, Kumiko (National Institute of Infectious Diseases), KOYAMA, Ryuta (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Do you know "trogocytosis"? It is derived from the Greek word "trogo", which means "to nibble", and is a cell-cell interaction in which one cell nipping bites off another. Trogocytosis is widely observed in eukaryotes such as immune cells, microglia and even in parasitic protozoa, and is considered to be a novel information exchange machinery. In this workshop, scientists from different fields get together to exchange current knowledge and discuss the significance and molecular mechanisms of trogocytosis compared to phagocytosis.

3PW-15 December 4 (Fri) PM
Bridging the gap between upstream and downstream mechanisms on morphological diversification in insects
Organizer
TAJIRI, Reiko (The University of Tokyo), OHDE, Takahiro (Kyoto University)
Detail

Upstream factors that drive morphological evolution, as well as molecular and cellular processes that directly shape or color individual organisms, have been widely explored. However, the mechanistic links between the upstream factors and the direct processes are largely elusive. Based on studies done at different levels, from upstream genetic regulation to downstream morphogenesis, of the evolution and development of insect morphologies, we aim to reach an integrative understanding of how diverse morphologies are created.

3PW-16 December 4 (Fri) PM
Functional control of light-sensitive proteins
Co-hosted by: Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas "Non-equilibrium-state molecular movies and their applications (Molecular Movies)"
Organizer
PARK, Sam-Yong (Yokohama City University), HINO, Tomoya (Tottori University)
Detail

Using light-sensitive proteins to allow non-invasive control of different processes by light has helped us to understand various life phenomena. As well as revealing new functions and accelerating drug discovery, light-sensitive proteins, chromophores and peptides are opening up a challenging new field to understand photo-response mechanisms in detail. In this workshop, we will discuss the reactions of light-sensitive proteins carrying various chromophores, studied by structural biology and rapid dynamics methods.

3PW-17 December 4 (Fri) PM
Let's get started! Cell Swarm Intelligence
Organizer
HIRASHIMA, Tsuyoshi (Kyoto University), KANO, Takeshi (Tohoku University)
Detail

Cells often display intelligent behaviors by swarming in our bodies. Cell swarming is analogous to animal swarming in that higher-order functions are derived from local interactions between individuals. However, the mechanisms for the emergence of intelligent behaviors have been unexplored. Here, we take the first step forward to understand the principles that govern the "cell swarm intelligence" by gathering expertise from researchers studying cells, ants, and human societies.

3PW-18 December 4 (Fri) PM
Evolution and Diversification of Cellular Energy Homeostasis: Insight from GTP research
Organizer
TAKEUCHI, Koh (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology), NAGASE, Lisa (KEK)
Detail

Discovery of cellular GTP sensor in 2016 opened a new GTP research that now connects the GTP energy metabolism to the robustness of organelle and cell, and even to cell-cell communications. The GTP research would unveil the evolutional diversification of cells and high-order functions of multi cellular organisms. In this workshop, GTP as the keyword, we focus on the integrated approaches to understand the evolution of cellular energy metabolism.

3PW-19 December 4 (Fri) PM
D-Amino acids and the phenomenon of life
Organizer
KIMURA, Tomonori (National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition), SASABE, Jumpei (Keio University)
Detail

Most amino acids have D- and L-enantiomers (chiral bodies). Living organisms on Earth predominantly utilize L-amino acids, and the roles of D-amino acids have received little attention. Recent technological advancement has enabled enantiomer-specific quantification of amino acids, and accumulating evidence are now revealing that D-amino acids have distinctive functions in diverse physiology and play important roles in pathophysiology and diagnosis of human diseases. This workshop embodies a magnificent world of D-amino acids.

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