The 43rd Annual Meeting of the Molecular Biology Society of Japan

Symposia

Symposia will be held as Zoom webinars. In addition to the live webcast, on-demand viewing will be also available for participants for approximately one week once it is ready.

Session Numbers: Date + AM/PM (A/P) + Symposium (S) + - (hyphen) + Channel
(ex.) 1AS-01: Day 1, AM, Channel 1

*Session time: (AM)9:00-11:30 /(PM)15:30-18:00
The total time for the presentations and discussions is 135 minutes as scheduled. However, additional 15 minutes have been allotted to allow more time for the change of speakers.
*Language: English only

"Meet the speakers" talk room will be available for both symposia and workshops after the session. Please use this room to talk with the speakers individually or to discuss among the speakers.

1AS-04 December 2 (Wed) AM
Cell competition in development and cancer
Organizer
IGAKI, Tatsushi (Kyoto University), OHSAWA, Shizue (Nagoya University)
Detail

Cells in the animal tissue compete for their survival with neighboring cells. For instance, in developing tissues or cell culture systems, cells with higher fitness actively eliminate neighboring cells with lower fitness by inducing apoptosis. This phenomenon, called cell competition, seems to be an evolutionarily conserved multicellular process which could play important roles in tissue development and homeostasis. Recent studies in the roles and mechanisms of cell competition have opened new ways of looking at animal development and cancer regulation. In this symposium, we will summarize recent progresses in understanding cell competition and discuss how it contributes to animal development and cancer.

1AS-09 December 2 (Wed) AM
Diversity in virology: 2020 and beyond
Organizer
TOMONAGA, Keizo (Kyoto University), PARRISH, F. Nicholas (RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences)
Detail

Virology in the 20th century progressed with the aim of overcoming pathogenic viruses in animals and plants. Isolation of viruses and study of their pathology in model organisms was greatly advanced through development of culture cell systems and genetic engineering techniques. This virology has established our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of viral replication and pathogenesis. Now, virus research is entering an era of diversity. In addition to the studies using cutting-edge techniques, previously neglected non-pathogenic viruses, as well as the diversity of environmental viruses, are now attracting many researchers interested in the nature of viruses. Studies of endogenous viruses and virus-host co-evolution have begun to predict the origin of viruses and highlight their roles in life evolution over millennia. Where will this newly diversified virology go? In this symposium, we will have information exchanges and active discussions to explore new concepts and future directions in virology.

1AS-10 December 2 (Wed) AM
Unraveling the life sciences with genome-wide analyses
Organizer
YAMAMOTO, Takuya (Kyoto University), YAMADA, Yasuhiro (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Due to massively parallel sequencing techniques, it is now relatively easy to perform qualitative and quantitative genome-wide analyses to study the regulatory mechanisms of DNA and RNA sequences. Researchers in various life science fields have used these techniques to elucidate diverse systems fundamental to life. In this symposium, following on these gains, we will look at how genome-wide analysis will transform our understanding of several relevant life science topics such as cancer, aging, development, stem cells, genetics, and evolution, with attention to advances in methodologies.

1PS-01 December 2 (Wed) PM
What the molecular biology of archaea tells us
Organizer
ATOMI, Haruyuki (Kyoto University), ISHINO, Yoshizumi (Kyushu University)
Detail

Members of the Archaea, which comprise the third domain of life, exhibit unique biological functions not found in bacteria or eukaryotes. In addition, they also utilize mechanisms that are considered ancestral to those utilized in eukaryotes, most notably in functions related to information processing. In this symposium, we will illustrate the frontiers of archaeal research, and hope to discuss what the molecular biology of Archaea tells us in terms of biological evolution, DNA replication and repair, transcription and physiology.

1PS-07 December 2 (Wed) PM
Land plants viewed from bryophytes and charophytes
Organizer
ARAKI, Takashi (Kyoto University), SAKAKIBARA, Keiko (Rikkyo University)
Detail

Recently, genome information and molecular biological tools and techniques have become available in three major clades of bryophytes, namely, mosses, liverworts, and hornworts. This trends extend to charophytes, sister groups of land plants. With these developments, we are now able to understand molecular bases of the origin and evolution of key characters of land plants. In this symposium, we will introduce recent advances and will discuss land plants' evolution viewed from basal land plants and their sister groups.

1PS-09 December 2 (Wed) PM
Expanding Structural Biology
Organizer
TOCHIO, Hidehito (Kyoto University), KOBAYASHI, Takuya (Kansai Medical University)
Detail

Due to the explosive technological progress of cryo-EM in recent years, the field of structural biology has reached a historic turning point. In addition, various technological innovations are progressing in the fields of molecular simulation, fluorescence imaging, and data science. Now, the environment surrounding biomolecular research is changing drastically. In the near future, dramatic progress will be made in the understanding and research methods of biomolecules. It is important that the benefits from these innovations reach all life science researchers, a niche of specialized experts, which will contribute to the development of overall molecular cell biology. This symposium invites researchers who work on various issues in the life sciences such as basic biology, medicine, and pharmacy through structural biology approaches, to share the latest information on biomolecular research, as well as to discuss future structural biology prospects.

1PS-10 December 2 (Wed) PM
WPI joint symposium for innovative life science & technology
Organizer
YANAGITA, Motoko (Kyoto University/ASHBi), HIRAO, Atsushi (Kanazawa University/NanoLSI)
Detail

Since 2007, the “World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI)” has built many research centers, in which the world's highest level of research is being conducted. One goal of this project is the creation of fusion areas in research. The project leaders of Immunology Frontier Research Center (IFReC) at Osaka University, International Institute for Integrative Sleep Medicine (IIIS) at University of Tsukuba, International Research Center for Neurointelligence (IRCN) at University of Tokyo, Nano Life Science Institute (NanoLSI) at Kanazawa University, and Institute for the Advanced Study of Human Biology (ASHBi) at Kyoto University have recommended young and extremely talented PIs to give lectures on their cutting edge research in this symposium. The five centers cover a wide range of fields such as immunology, sleep medicine, neurointelligence, nano life science, and human biology. We hope this symposium will help exchanges of ideas across the research centers and strengthen the connection between young and talented researchers including the audience.

2AS-01 December 3 (Thu) AM
Machine learning in biology
Organizer
SUGIMURA, Kaoru (Kyoto University), KOBAYASHI, J. Tetsuya (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Machine learning has become increasingly important in biology. This symposium aims at bringing together scientists from various disciplines who employ machine learning to deepen our understanding of living systems. Presentations cover a wide spectrum of topics such as molecular dynamics, single cell sequencing analysis, cell bioengineering, and organogenesis modelling. By integrating a variety of research subjects ranging from molecules up to organs, we hope that the symposium will stimulate active discussion on more universal technologies and concepts.

2AS-04 December 3 (Thu) AM
Dynamic and structural regulation of chromosome inheritance in meiosis
Organizer
CARLTON, Peter (Kyoto University), SHINOHARA, Miki (Kindai University)
Detail

The correct inheritance of genetic material through sexual reproduction is ensured by a complex array of regulatory mechanisms operating throughout the cell division process of meiosis. While the drastic morphological changes undergone by chromosomes in meiosis, as well as the coordination between recombination and the discrete two-step loss of chromosome cohesion that enables correct chromosome segregation have been the subject of intense investigation, the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, and by extension all of eukaryotic genetics, have only recently begun to emerge. We will share recent developments in the field and encourage discussion with the aim of generating new connections and understanding.

2AS-09 December 3 (Thu) AM
Evolution of gut microbiota in animals: Host-microbe interactions and mechanisms
Organizer
KATAYAMA, Takane (Kyoto University), HAYAKAWA, Takashi (Hokkaido University)
Detail

No animal in nature can live without its commensal bacteria. The association begins after birth and continues throughout life at various sites of the body such as the skin, the oral cavity, and the intestine. Recent studies have shown that gut microbes significantly affect host physiology and pathology, and in several cases, specific metabolites or genes/proteins have been linked with particular physiological and pathological alterations in the host. However, our knowledge regarding what shapes the gut microbiota, how the microbial continuity is regulated during life, and why the symbiotic relationship is established as evolutionary consequences remains fragmentary. This symposium will focus on molecular dialogues underlying host-microbe interactions from a viewpoint of molecular biology and evolution. To this end, we will invite five to six speakers who have addressed mechanistic questions regarding these issues using insects, fishes, rodents, non-human primates, and humans.

2AS-10 December 3 (Thu) AM
Toward understanding and manipulation of neural bases underlying animal behaviors and psychiatric diseases
Organizer
IMAYOSHI, Itaru (Kyoto University), HAYASHI-TAKAGI, Akiko (RIKEN Center for Brain Science)
Detail

Recent studies have revealed neural bases underlying animal's innate behaviors and higher brain functions. In addition to the physiological understandings with electrophysiology and neural activity imaging, neural circuits studies at the molecular levels, such as gene expression controls and protein modifications/transportations, are progressing first. And, development of optogenetic and chemogenetic actuator tools which are able to artificially manipulate neural circuits has been intensely carried out. These tools have been applied to neurons, glial cells or neural stem cells in the brain, and have contributed to understanding of working principles of the brain at the system level, as well as the molecular, circuit and animal individual levels. Application of these cutting edge technologies has also contributed to understanding of neurological and mental diseases caused by disfunction or misregulation of brain functions. In this symposium, pioneer scientists will introduce the frontiers of these research topics, and we will discuss future possibilities of neural circuit research and artificial interventions.

2PS-03 December 3 (Thu) PM
Challenge to technological breakthrough for a more in-depth understanding of complex biosystems
Organizer
EIRAKU, Mototsugu (Kyoto University), INOMATA, Hidehiko (RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research)
Detail

In recent years, with the development of molecular biology and cell biology, a basic understanding of complex biosystems such as cancer, nervous system, and ontogeny has dramatically advanced. In order to reach a more in-depth understanding, it is necessary to develop new technologies that measure and analyze biosystems with higher sensitivity and resolution, and capture phenomena from new aspects. In this session, we will focus on researchers working on the development of original technologies in search of a breakthrough for a more in-depth understanding of complex biosystems.

2PS-09 December 3 (Thu) PM
Frontiers in Omics-triggered Life Sciences
Organizer
ISHIHAMA, Yasushi (Kyoto University), FAGARASAN, Sidonia (RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences)
Detail

Recent advances in next-generation sequencers and mass spectrometry have made it possible to produce large-scale datasets relatively easily. In addition, state-of-the-art statistics approaches allow the extraction of notable phenomena and molecules from these data. However, the omics measurement based on these approaches is still often used as a hypothesis confirming tool. In this symposium, we will introduce examples of life science research starting from unbiased omics measurement where the performance of the omics technology becomes the most effective, and would like to discuss how to maximize the potential of omics analysis in each area of biology.

2PS-10 December 3 (Thu) PM
A molecular link between cellular senescence and age-relevant disorders
Organizer
KONDOH, Hiroshi (Kyoto University), TAKAHASHI, Akiko (The Cancer Institute of JFCR)
Detail

World-wide, human society is aging, both in developed as well as in developing countries. People over age 65 constitute 8.7% of the world population. Japan represents a super-aging society, in which the aging population exceeds 25 %. While life expectancy is increasing in Japan, there is also an increase of frail people, who are predisposed to be bedridden. Thus, individually variable elderlies are observed in super-aging countries, as aging is a highly complex biological process exhibiting great individual variation. While several hallmarks of aging are listed, cellular senescence is one of the most prominent features in human aging. Recent advances in aging research identified the double-edged sword behavior of cellular senescence. Senescence would serve as a barrier against tumorigenesis in vivo, while SASP, senescence-associated secretary phenotype, from senescent cells promotes sterile inflammation. In this symposium, we would focus on the close link between cellular senescence and organismal aging/ aging-related diseases.

2PS-15 December 3 (Thu) PM
Principles of plant-microbe interactions revealed at molecular levels
Organizer
YURIMOTO, Hiroya (Kyoto University), HIRUMA, Kei (The University of Tokyo)
Detail

Wide varieties of microorganisms colonize the surface of the aerial parts of plants (phyllosphere) and the area of soil surrounding plant roots (rhizosphere). Plant-microbe interactions contribute not only to their growth and proliferation but also to maintenance of ecosystem and global environment. Due to the progress of analytical tools and techniques such as next-generation sequencing, community composition of plant-associated microbes and physiology and ecology of both plants and microbes have recently been deeply understood. In this symposium, we would like to introduce recent research trends in the molecular mechanism of plant-microbe interactions revealed by the analysis of metabolites, proteins, and genes involved in determination of the specificity between plants and microbes and plant-growth promotion by microbes. We will also discuss future prospects of agricultural application of the principles of plant-molecular interactions.

3AS-01 December 4 (Fri) AM
Common Principles Lying behind Animal and Plant Circadian Homeostasis
Organizer
DOI, Masao (Kyoto University), ENDO, Motomu (Nara Institute of Science and Technology)
Detail

Circadian rhythms are maintained by multiple feedback loops (FL). In addition to intracellular FL via transcription and post-transcriptional regulation of clock genes, intratissue-level FL formed by cell-to-cell interactions, FL mediated by systemic organ-to-organ communications, FL via signals from environment or via social interactions with other organisms are each potentially important for maintaining stable rhythms in vivo. Common principles underlying animal and plant circadian homeostasis will be discussed in this symposium. Dynamic coordination of multiple loops at different layers are likely important for efficient adaptation to severe environmental changes in temperature, light, and energy source.

3AS-04 December 4 (Fri) AM
Germ Cells: Mechanism and In Vitro Reconstitution of Genetic and Epigenetic Inheritance
Organizer
SAITOU, Mitinori (Kyoto University), HAYASHI, Katsuhiko (Kyushu University)
Detail

Germ cells differentiate into spermatozoa or oocytes and create new individuals by their fusion, perpetuating our genetic and epigenetic information into new generations. Importantly, they create the diversity of such information through meiotic recombination and epigenetic reprogramming/programming, serving as a driving force of evolution. In this symposium, we will discuss a frontier of the research for investigating the mechanism of genetic and epigenetic inheritance by germ cells and of the efforts for reconstituting such processes in vitro, with a reference to its potential impact on society in general.

3AS-09 December 4 (Fri) AM
Multiscale Synthetic Biology: From artificial cells to multicellular engineering
Organizer
SAITO, Hirohide (Kyoto University), EBISUYA, Miki (EMBL Barcelona)
Detail

Synthetic Biology has a promising outlook in biotechnology as well as basic sciences for understanding the self-organizing principle of biological systems in life. Synthetic biology approaches have been attracting biologists, chemists, physicists and bioengineers who are concerned with designing and constructing artificial biological systems across different scales. In this symposium, we invite distinguished speakers from diverse fields and discuss recent hot topics in synthetic biology, including designing and evolving artificial cells to investigate the origin of life, engineering living cells for practical applications, and modulating multicellular systems to examine the underlying mechanisms. We would also like to discuss common design principles of life-like systems and future challenges of synthetic biology.

3AS-10 December 4 (Fri) AM
T cell aging and exhaustion: from a perspective of metabolism
Organizer
HAMAZAKI, Yoko (Kyoto University), YAMASHITA, Masakatsu (Ehime University)
Detail

T cells play a central role in the coordination of adaptive immune responses and cell-mediated immunity. Recently, “T cell aging” (dysregulation of T cell function with age) has been recognized as a basis of not only immunological deterioration but also various age-related diseases such as metabolic diseases. On the other hand, persistent antigen exposure during cancers or chronic virus infections upregulates the expression of immune checkpoint molecules and causes “T-cell exhaustion”, a functional failure similar but distinct from T cell aging. In this symposium, recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of T-cell aging and exhaustion will be presented from a perspective of immunometabolism, a rapidly growing field. Furthermore, possible interventions to rejuvenate immunity in elderly and cancer patients will be discussed.

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